out for a walk
Andie. 19. Cis.
out for a walk
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"Statistics reported on by Dr. Gary Gates of the Williams Institute, among many others, show that, compared with the larger population, bisexuals are disproportionately women and people of color. It’s pretty clear that these groups are less likely to have access to privilege in the first place and are more likely to be engaged in feminist, civil rights and social justice causes."
Amy Andre in Heterosexual Privilege and Bisexual Hearts (via bialogue-group)
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"We now know that 24 hours without sleep, or a week of sleeping four or five hours a night induces an impairment equivalent to a blood alcohol level of .1 percent. We would never say, ‘This person is a great worker! He’s drunk all the time!’ yet we continue to celebrate people who sacrifice sleep for work."

Insights from the doctor who coaches athletes on sleep. Pair with the science of what actually happens while you sleep and how it affects your every waking hour.

More on sleep here.

(via explore-blog)

I’ve really got to start getting more rest…

(via sugahwaatah)

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malformalady:

The glass-enclosed funeral monument of Inez Clarke at Chicago’s Graceland Cemetery. 6-year-old Inez Clarke was killed by lightning while on a picnic with her family. Her parents, stunned by the tragic loss, commissioned a life-sized statue of their daughter to be placed over her grave. There are tales of the statue weeping as well as claims of Inez actually moving. It is said, during violent thunderstorms, Inez vanishes from her glass box and roams around the cemetery until the storm is over.
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upallnightogetloki:

i-was-a-dragon:

candycoatedracism:

An angsty post about cultural appropriation towards pagans

No it is not.  Not even close.  
Up top: The Ouija board is a board game that was invented in 1890, not a religious or cultural matter of any kind.  It is so new, that it is actually currently patented by Hasbro, which is why most versions you see don’t actually say Ouija on them.  The mystical history of the ouija board was pretty much invented out of whole cloth by its creators, and even if they were true, their version of events is actually cultural appropriation from the chinese, so no, there is literally nothing that a white pagan could legitimately be upset about in the use of the Ouija board in jewelry and nailart.  
The five-pointed-star is a symbol that has been so widely used in history, it’s current ‘wicca’ meaning is actually the odd man out, here.  Using it as a protective symbol is within it’s historical uses, and if it were in fact being misused in these images it is not being used in a way that is causing you harm.  
But the biggest difference is that the pictures on the bottom?  They’re part of an ongoing problem in american culture.  Seeing a pagan symbol used in a way you don’t agree with may be upsetting, but native people are so marginalized and fetishized that some people believe they are imaginary.  Native women suffer outrageous statistics or rape, violence, and murder.  The projected lifespan of a native person is drastically shorter than that of a white person due to outside factors.  Asian women in the US are seen as a fetish and ‘geisha dolls’, while the men are considered a joke.  Blacks in the US are unjustly incarcerated, murdered with impunity, and suffer levels of violence and discrimination I’m only just beginning to understand.
So unless the Ouija board and Supernatural are causing genocide and rape, do not compare the two.  It’s okay to be upset about something, but do not claim that misplaced anger is even close to the legitimate anger the bottom images should cause.

That rebuttal was on point
upallnightogetloki:

i-was-a-dragon:

candycoatedracism:

An angsty post about cultural appropriation towards pagans

No it is not.  Not even close.  
Up top: The Ouija board is a board game that was invented in 1890, not a religious or cultural matter of any kind.  It is so new, that it is actually currently patented by Hasbro, which is why most versions you see don’t actually say Ouija on them.  The mystical history of the ouija board was pretty much invented out of whole cloth by its creators, and even if they were true, their version of events is actually cultural appropriation from the chinese, so no, there is literally nothing that a white pagan could legitimately be upset about in the use of the Ouija board in jewelry and nailart.  
The five-pointed-star is a symbol that has been so widely used in history, it’s current ‘wicca’ meaning is actually the odd man out, here.  Using it as a protective symbol is within it’s historical uses, and if it were in fact being misused in these images it is not being used in a way that is causing you harm.  
But the biggest difference is that the pictures on the bottom?  They’re part of an ongoing problem in american culture.  Seeing a pagan symbol used in a way you don’t agree with may be upsetting, but native people are so marginalized and fetishized that some people believe they are imaginary.  Native women suffer outrageous statistics or rape, violence, and murder.  The projected lifespan of a native person is drastically shorter than that of a white person due to outside factors.  Asian women in the US are seen as a fetish and ‘geisha dolls’, while the men are considered a joke.  Blacks in the US are unjustly incarcerated, murdered with impunity, and suffer levels of violence and discrimination I’m only just beginning to understand.
So unless the Ouija board and Supernatural are causing genocide and rape, do not compare the two.  It’s okay to be upset about something, but do not claim that misplaced anger is even close to the legitimate anger the bottom images should cause.

That rebuttal was on point
upallnightogetloki:

i-was-a-dragon:

candycoatedracism:

An angsty post about cultural appropriation towards pagans

No it is not.  Not even close.  
Up top: The Ouija board is a board game that was invented in 1890, not a religious or cultural matter of any kind.  It is so new, that it is actually currently patented by Hasbro, which is why most versions you see don’t actually say Ouija on them.  The mystical history of the ouija board was pretty much invented out of whole cloth by its creators, and even if they were true, their version of events is actually cultural appropriation from the chinese, so no, there is literally nothing that a white pagan could legitimately be upset about in the use of the Ouija board in jewelry and nailart.  
The five-pointed-star is a symbol that has been so widely used in history, it’s current ‘wicca’ meaning is actually the odd man out, here.  Using it as a protective symbol is within it’s historical uses, and if it were in fact being misused in these images it is not being used in a way that is causing you harm.  
But the biggest difference is that the pictures on the bottom?  They’re part of an ongoing problem in american culture.  Seeing a pagan symbol used in a way you don’t agree with may be upsetting, but native people are so marginalized and fetishized that some people believe they are imaginary.  Native women suffer outrageous statistics or rape, violence, and murder.  The projected lifespan of a native person is drastically shorter than that of a white person due to outside factors.  Asian women in the US are seen as a fetish and ‘geisha dolls’, while the men are considered a joke.  Blacks in the US are unjustly incarcerated, murdered with impunity, and suffer levels of violence and discrimination I’m only just beginning to understand.
So unless the Ouija board and Supernatural are causing genocide and rape, do not compare the two.  It’s okay to be upset about something, but do not claim that misplaced anger is even close to the legitimate anger the bottom images should cause.

That rebuttal was on point
upallnightogetloki:

i-was-a-dragon:

candycoatedracism:

An angsty post about cultural appropriation towards pagans

No it is not.  Not even close.  
Up top: The Ouija board is a board game that was invented in 1890, not a religious or cultural matter of any kind.  It is so new, that it is actually currently patented by Hasbro, which is why most versions you see don’t actually say Ouija on them.  The mystical history of the ouija board was pretty much invented out of whole cloth by its creators, and even if they were true, their version of events is actually cultural appropriation from the chinese, so no, there is literally nothing that a white pagan could legitimately be upset about in the use of the Ouija board in jewelry and nailart.  
The five-pointed-star is a symbol that has been so widely used in history, it’s current ‘wicca’ meaning is actually the odd man out, here.  Using it as a protective symbol is within it’s historical uses, and if it were in fact being misused in these images it is not being used in a way that is causing you harm.  
But the biggest difference is that the pictures on the bottom?  They’re part of an ongoing problem in american culture.  Seeing a pagan symbol used in a way you don’t agree with may be upsetting, but native people are so marginalized and fetishized that some people believe they are imaginary.  Native women suffer outrageous statistics or rape, violence, and murder.  The projected lifespan of a native person is drastically shorter than that of a white person due to outside factors.  Asian women in the US are seen as a fetish and ‘geisha dolls’, while the men are considered a joke.  Blacks in the US are unjustly incarcerated, murdered with impunity, and suffer levels of violence and discrimination I’m only just beginning to understand.
So unless the Ouija board and Supernatural are causing genocide and rape, do not compare the two.  It’s okay to be upset about something, but do not claim that misplaced anger is even close to the legitimate anger the bottom images should cause.

That rebuttal was on point
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veganvibez:

BUNBUN
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policymic:

Photographer uses female body hair to challenge traditional beauty standards

Ben Hopper has recently published a photo series of black and white portraits, each capturing beautiful women bearing armpit hair. Hopper notes on his blog: “Although armpit hair is a natural state, it has become a statement. Why is that? For almost a century we have been brainwashed by the beauty industry, encouraging hair removal.” 
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

Photographer uses female body hair to challenge traditional beauty standards

Ben Hopper has recently published a photo series of black and white portraits, each capturing beautiful women bearing armpit hair. Hopper notes on his blog: “Although armpit hair is a natural state, it has become a statement. Why is that? For almost a century we have been brainwashed by the beauty industry, encouraging hair removal.” 
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

Photographer uses female body hair to challenge traditional beauty standards

Ben Hopper has recently published a photo series of black and white portraits, each capturing beautiful women bearing armpit hair. Hopper notes on his blog: “Although armpit hair is a natural state, it has become a statement. Why is that? For almost a century we have been brainwashed by the beauty industry, encouraging hair removal.” 
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

Photographer uses female body hair to challenge traditional beauty standards

Ben Hopper has recently published a photo series of black and white portraits, each capturing beautiful women bearing armpit hair. Hopper notes on his blog: “Although armpit hair is a natural state, it has become a statement. Why is that? For almost a century we have been brainwashed by the beauty industry, encouraging hair removal.” 
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

Photographer uses female body hair to challenge traditional beauty standards

Ben Hopper has recently published a photo series of black and white portraits, each capturing beautiful women bearing armpit hair. Hopper notes on his blog: “Although armpit hair is a natural state, it has become a statement. Why is that? For almost a century we have been brainwashed by the beauty industry, encouraging hair removal.” 
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

Photographer uses female body hair to challenge traditional beauty standards

Ben Hopper has recently published a photo series of black and white portraits, each capturing beautiful women bearing armpit hair. Hopper notes on his blog: “Although armpit hair is a natural state, it has become a statement. Why is that? For almost a century we have been brainwashed by the beauty industry, encouraging hair removal.” 
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

Photographer uses female body hair to challenge traditional beauty standards

Ben Hopper has recently published a photo series of black and white portraits, each capturing beautiful women bearing armpit hair. Hopper notes on his blog: “Although armpit hair is a natural state, it has become a statement. Why is that? For almost a century we have been brainwashed by the beauty industry, encouraging hair removal.” 
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

Photographer uses female body hair to challenge traditional beauty standards

Ben Hopper has recently published a photo series of black and white portraits, each capturing beautiful women bearing armpit hair. Hopper notes on his blog: “Although armpit hair is a natural state, it has become a statement. Why is that? For almost a century we have been brainwashed by the beauty industry, encouraging hair removal.” 
Read more | Follow policymic
policymic:

Photographer uses female body hair to challenge traditional beauty standards

Ben Hopper has recently published a photo series of black and white portraits, each capturing beautiful women bearing armpit hair. Hopper notes on his blog: “Although armpit hair is a natural state, it has become a statement. Why is that? For almost a century we have been brainwashed by the beauty industry, encouraging hair removal.” 
Read more | Follow policymic
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spyduck:

buzzfeed:

This is the extremely upsetting truth about baby carrots.


Baby corn reigning supreme right now
spyduck:

buzzfeed:

This is the extremely upsetting truth about baby carrots.


Baby corn reigning supreme right now
spyduck:

buzzfeed:

This is the extremely upsetting truth about baby carrots.


Baby corn reigning supreme right now
spyduck:

buzzfeed:

This is the extremely upsetting truth about baby carrots.


Baby corn reigning supreme right now
spyduck:

buzzfeed:

This is the extremely upsetting truth about baby carrots.


Baby corn reigning supreme right now
spyduck:

buzzfeed:

This is the extremely upsetting truth about baby carrots.


Baby corn reigning supreme right now
spyduck:

buzzfeed:

This is the extremely upsetting truth about baby carrots.


Baby corn reigning supreme right now
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latestfashioninspiration:

Fashion Inspiration